Training Tips

  • Get a thorough medical exam prior to beginning any running program.
  • Seek medical attention with injuries. Don’t let little aches and pains turn into bigger problems by not seeking timely medical advice (hopefully by a physician interested in running and/or exercise).
  • Go slow! The biggest mistake runners make are going too fast. The best way to judge your pace is by using the “talk test.” Run at a comfortable pace that allows you to talk with a training partner.
  • Observe the “rules of the road”. Watch out for cars and not for drivers to look out for you. It is best to run facing traffic so that you can see approaching cars in case action on your part is necessary.
  • Dress properly. Use common sense! If it’s dark, wear white or reflective clothing. If it’s cold, wear layers of clothing, gloves, and a wool ski cap to retain heat. On hot sunny days, use sun block, sunglasses, sun protective hat, and light colored clothing.
  • Wear running shoes but don’t continue to wear worn out shoes. Purchase your shoes at a specialty store where the staff are knowledgeable. As simple as it sounds, running shoes should only be used for running. It is usually time to replace shoes after 400-500 miles (so maintain your mileage log).
  • Don’t use headphones when running outside. They tend to tune you out from your surroundings, which make you more susceptible to hazards (i.e., cars, bikers, dogs, and criminals).
  • If running alone let someone know where you will be running and when you expect to return. Remember to carry some identification and money for a phone call.
  • Include a running partner in your program, if possible. A partner with similar abilities and goals can provide motivation and camaraderie.
  • Prior to your runs do some light stretching exercises. This reduces muscle tightness and increases your range of motion. It is also a good idea to do these stretching exercises after your workout.